Walk of No Shame event to raise awareness

R.I.S.E. is hoping to attract a crowd as large as this one at their event. Photo from R.I.S.E.'s Facebook page.

Stevenson University’s “Reach Out. Inspire. Strengthen. Empower.” club, R.I.S.E., will sponsor a new event called the “Walk of No Shame” on Sunday, April 22 from 6-9 p.m. in the Caves Sports and Wellness Center (OM).

Dr. Ingrid Tulloch, advisor of R.I.S.E., said the Walk of No Shame “is really about not shaming people.” The original “SlutWalk” movement started in 2011 after remarks by Canadian police officer blamed a woman’s victimization on her clothing, which has since sparked an international phenomenon spearheaded by Amber Rose. Most of the literature connected to the movement suggests that clothes do not imply consent for denigration, oppression and assault.

Tulloch explained that students have been trying to make this event happen for a while, and it has been in the works since last June. Members of R.I.S.E. want students to embrace who they are through this movement.

This event is about raising awareness to end rape culture and learn to stop blaming. The movement is a chance for survivors of sexual assault and victims of shaming to tell their stories and know that they have support on campus.

Stevenson’s R.I.S.E. club is hoping to attract a large crowd for their “Walk of No Shame” event on April 22. (Photo from R.I.S.E. Facebook page)

The walk is not just for women; it is being held so that everyone can learn to be proud of who they are regardless of gender. Anyone, along with guests, are allowed and encouraged to participate in this event. According to Gillian Nutter, public relations chair of R.I.S.E., students from other schools have asked to attend, and Stevenson students have asked to bring guests. Tulloch and Nutter expect a fairly good attendance for this event.

“This event is composed of tabling and activities, performances and the walk along, with an open mic for survivors to tell their stories,” she added.

Nearly every club on campus was contacted regarding the event, and Nutter said that many contributed great ideas and are willing to help. Ultimately, R.I.S.E. hopes that this event will be a collaboration among the entire Stevenson community.

“It is crucial that events like this exist to help show support to those in the community and help showcase that it is still an issue that can affect anyone and everyone,” said Nutter.

Tulloch sees this event as becoming a tradition, since it exemplifies Stevenson’s core values, particularly community. Organizers of the event hope it will allow individuals to share their story and show support for others.

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