Zombies take over Stevenson

Zombies ready to take on the humans.

Humans versus Zombies (HvZ), an intense variation of the game tag, began this year on April 17 and will conclude on April 24. This is Stevenson’s fifth year hosting the game, which is sponsored by the Video Games Club, the Anime Club, and the Dodgeball Club.

Humans prepare to defend themselves from approaching zombies. (Photo from Kris DeJesus)

The rules of HvZ are pretty simple. To start, one individual is chosen to be the “original” zombie. Only the moderators know who this zombie is on day one. The original zombie’s goal is to tag as many human players as possible, adding them to the zombie horde. While the zombies are trying to tag humans, the human’s main objective is to avoid any conflicts and stay alive.

Humans can use weapons, such as Nerf blasters that have been approved by the HvZ committee and sock grenades, to protect themselves from approaching zombies. Once humans are tagged, they must give the zombie their ID number in order for that zombie to record on their list of tags. Participants of the game are also required to wear bandanas that signify whether they are a human or a zombie.

Clayton Solomon, head moderator along with David Warner, said that the most important rule outlines the locations of free play zones, safe zones, and off-limits zones. These zones allow for fun and safe play without disrupting academic life. The free play zones include all sidewalks, quads, and open areas. Safe Zones include a few feet in front of each building, residence halls, crosswalks, overhangs, Ratcliffe Center, and Rockland. Off-limit zones include all academic buildings, the stadium, the gym, sports fields, the mailroom, the boardwalk, and ALL of Owings Mills North.

Zombies with a group of humans in sight. (Photo from YouTube)

Colleen Harrington, the original zombie from 2016, said that being the designated first zombie was one of the most thrilling aspects of the game. She was determined not to blow her cover on day one, and kept her position a secret. Harrington said she played a very tactical game by tricking humans who were close to her, which ultimately led to her setting the school record for the highest number of humans turned on day one. Harrington said, “This game is the ultimate way to make new friends. I can’t wait to relieve some stress once finals come!”

To find out more information about the campus-wide game of Humans versus Zombies, visit the game’s official website.

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