Public speaking contest slated

A public speaking contest slated for April 22, 2016, will be open to all students, said Christine Noya, assistant professor of business communication. The contest will include three speech categories: informative, persuasive and dramatic-interpretative. The department of business communication is sponsoring the campus-wide event.

Professor Noya, assistant professor of business communication, is the host of the public speaking contest. (Photo by Katlyn Lamp)

Christine Noya, assistant professor of business communication, is helping to organize the public speaking contest. (Photo by Katlyn Lamp)

An informative speech uses data and facts about a situation or issue to give the audience an insight into a specific topic, according to Noya. Informative speech topics can vary, for example, from the Industrial Revolution to U.S. foreign policies.

A persuasive speech focuses on the speaker’s goal to convince listeners to accept a specific point of view. Topics for a persuasive speech can vary from receiving money for good grades earned to changing to a vegan diet.

The dramatic-interpretative speech is a re-enactment of a reading or monologue to entertain the audience. Dramatic-interpretative topics vary from a famous speech to an excerpt from a play.

No specific topics are off-limits, but there are limitations. Speech topics cannot have any presentation of hate language, racial issues, or biases of gender or religion.

Participants need to pick one category to present to the audience and judges. Each speech has a time limit of three to five minutes. Two rounds of speakers per category will determine the winners, advancing the top three candidates from each speech category.

Each winner receives a $75 cash prize and all participants will receive a certificate of participation in the contest.

Participants can meet with Noya to discuss topics and speech structure. They should practice several times before the contest. Public speaking techniques are essential in order to improve speech. Noya recommends that participants use the three persuasive elements of ethos, logos, and pathos when creating their argument.

Participants must complete a registration form by March 4 and forward it to Noya via campus email. The forms are located outside of Noya’s office, which is Dawson Center 235, in the Student Activities Office, and within the libraries on the Greenspring and Owings Mills campus.

The event will be held from 1-4 p.m. in the School of Business and Leadership on the fourth floor.

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